Tag Archives: trying to get pregnant

Science of Pregnancy Week Two: Fertility

18 Apr

Your egg, preparing for debut

Girls are born with ~1-2 million eggs in their ovaries. In adulthood, a fraction of these eggs ripen. In a typical menstrual cycle, one egg is launched each month on a great lazy river ride. It’s released from the ovary, swept up in the tendrils of the fallopian tube, and ushered by a gentle tide toward the uterus.

When you had your period last week, your body flushed out an egg that was not fertilized during that adventure. But your body is already at work preparing the next contestant.

If you are trying to conceive, your most fertile period is in this window: the week leading up to, and including, ovulation.  Check an ovulation calendar to identify when you are most likely to become pregnant.

During this time, several hormones are working like greek goddesses in your system, bestowing vital gifts to prepare your egg for its journey: protective shield, snack bags, a safe landing zone— and plenty of sperm-grabber, just in case.

oocyte

Having sex to become pregnant: Why it is necessary?

15 Aug

The gorgeous plumes of a peacock are a classic example of a trait that emerged solely for sex appeal.

“Some are fancy on the outside.  Some are fancy on the inside.  Everybody’s fancy.  Everybody’s fine.  Your body’s fancy, and so is mine.”  –Fred Rogers (♫ listen here)

“Some mollusks (not many) can have children merely by sitting around and thinking about it.”   — E.B. White, Is Sex Really Necessary?

As it turns out, snail sex (a snail is a type of mollusk) is really far out:  Some can self-fertilize, some stab their mates during foreplay with harpoon-like “love darts,” and most snails have two sex organs, so they can do it both ways at the same time.  As E. B. White observed, “mollusks are infinitely varied in their loves, their hates and their predilections.”  See snails doing it!